Enjoy the musical talents of area youth as WQCS, 88.9 FM presents its annual one-hour special, Young Musicians Spotlight. Young Musicians Spotlight is underwritten by Shann's Tax Service, Inc. in Port St. Lucie. 

 

Hear local classical works for piano, along with a violinist and a solo vocal performance. 

Free Boating Safety Class

Drew Mello talks with John Thompson, Vice Flotilla Commander for Flotilla 58 with the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary in Fort Pierce. The Auxiliary will be offering free, one day boater safety education classes through August at their building on Seaway Drive in Fort Pierce. For information on the free About Boating Safety class click here: For information on U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 58 click here: May 21-27 is National Safe Boating Week.
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Treasure Coast Essay

Lightning safety tips

May 23, 2016

This is Paul Janensch with a Treasure Coast Essay about lightning.  Yes, it’s that time of year again.  Florida is the lightning capital of the U.S., with more deaths each year than any other state.  The most dangerous months are June, July and August.  Around here, morning is the most dangerous time of day.  Rain-filled clouds pushed by westerly winds, pile up above us.  When it thunders, remember these safety tips: Avoid open high ground and isolated tall trees.  Stay away from bodies of water – the ocean, the Lagoon, lakes, even swimming pools.  Seek shelter inside a building or hard-to

The deep-sea researchers were surveying an ocean ridge off the coast of Hawaii in 2015 and amid ordinary ocean floor fare — a bit of coral, some volcanic rock — they came across something surprising.

"Where did this guy come from? Holy cow!" one researcher said to his colleague.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Louisiana's hate-crime protections now cover law enforcement and first responders. Gov. John Bel Edwards signed the legislation on Thursday after it had passed easily in the Republican-controlled Legislature, NPR's Debbie Elliott reports.

President Obama came into office with a dream of a world without nuclear weapons, and he's sure to touch on this theme Friday when he becomes the first sitting U.S. president to visit Hiroshima, site of the world's first atomic bombing.

Yet Obama also has put the U.S. on course to spend around $1 trillion on upgrading its nuclear arsenal over the next three decades, critics say.

Everything about nuclear weapons is extreme: the implications of their use, the costs involved, and the strategic and political paradoxes they create.

In the marshy woods of Secaucus, N.J., a mosquito can make a happy home.

With water and shade under a canopy of maple trees, you could barely ask for more to start your own bloodsucking family.

For Gary Cardini, though, this is a battleground.

"You want to get them in the water before they're flying," explains Cardini, who supervises the field team for Hudson County Mosquito Control. "In the water, they're captive. You know where they are."

I wasn't expecting to go to the world's largest conference on women's rights and interview a bunch of men.

But at the Women Deliver conference in Copenhagen last week, I met a few 20-something guys in the crowd of 5,000 people doing something that is typically a woman's job: fighting for better reproductive health and family planning.

Baylor University has removed Ken Starr as president and suspended head football coach Art Briles amid the release of a report critical of how the school has treated allegations of sexual harassment and assault.

The Food and Drug Administration seems intent on bringing sugar out of the shadows.

Not only will food companies have to reveal, right on the package, how much sugar they've added to food; they also will have to call it by its real name.

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Skywatch With Jon Bell

On May 25th in the year AD 735 – that’s over 1200 years ago - Baeda, the Venerable Bede, died. He was an English monk who in the 8th Century was the first person we know of to have written scholarly works in the English language. He also wrote De Natura Rerum, which was a collection of works on geography and astronomy, much of it preserved knowledge from Greek civilization, but also knowledge gained by observation and deduction.

Click the image for the latest from The FPREN Storm Center

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